The Caves of CBSP,

A listing of their descriptions, as of January 1999.



BIG BAD AIR HOLE (SAB 005) Length: ? Depth: 30+'
Description: The entrance to the cave is a 15 foot long, 8 foot wide crevice. A hole at one end drops an undetermined distance, but is apparently about 40 feet. Equipment is required to enter the cave. The previous owner (Tolle S. Lemons, Sr.) reports the presents of water in the cave at times. When visited on September 1, 1963 by Orion Knox, David McKenzie, and James Reddell a carbide lamp would not burn below the 25 foot level because of bad air. It was not explored further. When the cave was visited on February 27, 1972, by James Jasek and Jimmy Schroeder, water was present about 25 feet below the surface.
Ref.: TSS files


BISCUIT CAN CAVE (SAB 006) (Biscuit Can Hole) Length: 80' Depth: 40'
Description: The cave entrance is a crevice about three feet wide and fifteen feet long which drops about fifteen feet to a ledge. At one end of the fissure it continues to drop, first along a slope and then vertically to a depth of about forty feet. Back to the northwest a silt-floored passage extends about twenty-five feet before ending. There was a pool of water at the bottom of the fissure.
History : October 14, 1962: Tom Phillips, Terry Raines, and James Reddell explored and surveyed the cave.1988: Cave is relocated by cavers during the monthly CBSP TSA volunteer work project.
Map January 23, 1963: Tom Phillips, Terry Raines and James Reddell surveyed the cave with Brunton & Tape. D. Smith drafted the map January 23, 1963.The cave survey occurred a second time. Jay Jordan and others mapped a cave they believed to be Biscuit in 1988. Ref : TSS files. Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


CAT CAVE (SAB 009) Length: 30' Depth: 50
Description: The entrance to Cat Cave is a 1 feet wide, 3 feet long crack which is connected by a narrow passage to a surface opening too small to enter. A house cat inhabited the passage when it was first explored. The entrance crevice connects after a few feet to a distinct level at 17 feet. A sloping passage extends on to a pit about 30 feet deep. Air in this pit is poor, but a carbide light burns. Two small passages extend from the bottom of the pit, but both are too small to enter. One is a 6" in diameter hole dropping into an apparent lower level. When the cave was entered a strong air current flowed up from this lower level. Equipment is useful but not necessary in the pit.
History: It was explored on December 1, 1963 by James Reddell, Orion Knox, and David McKenzie. The cave was entered on February 27, 1972, by James Jasek and Tom Pack. Biology: The cave is inhabited by spiders, harvestmen, crickets, collembolans and millepeds. Ref.: TSS files.


CICURINA CAVE (SAB 018) (Rattlesnake Hole) Length: 600' Depth: 35'
Description: The main entrance is a small round solution hole, approximately 2-1/2' in diameter. Its location is on the north side of Gorman Creek bed and drops about ten feet into a room about ten feet in diameter. This room occasionally harbors Rattlesnakes. In the bottom of the room a tight sloping passage leads down about thirty feet. The passage opens into a wide silt-floored room about seventy feet long. The room is thirty to fifty feet wide and from a few inches to six feet high. Large areas of the room and, in fact, large areas throughout the cave, contain silt up to or very near the ceiling. From this large low room a winding silt-floored passage leads for 130 feet to a junction. To the left a narrow passage goes about twenty feet before opening into a large low passage. To the right the main passage continues for about fifty feet before a seven foot drop beneath a twenty-five foot high dome occurs. It is possible (but not recommended) to climb up this dome and enter an irregular three foot high upper level passage. This passage in turn leads to a shallow second entrance about ten feet in diameter. During the first cave visit, this entrance was apparently not open. From the bottom of the dome is a short climb to the left. This leads up into a two to four foot high silt-floored area that eventually leads back to an eleven foot high dome. Beyond the dome a low crawl extends into the junction before the seven foot drop. The main passage beyond the dome room extends as a very wide passage that, after a short distance, splits into two passages. To the left it is about six feet high while the right hand passage is from one to six feet high. After about thirty feet they both intersect a junction passage that extends to the left about fifty feet before becoming too small. To the right it goes about 120 feet as a dropping passage containing an intermittent stream. Exploration ended at a pool. A later exploration entered a side passage that continued for an unknown distance as a water crawl. Survey remains to be done in the water passage. Cicurina is not a large cave, but it is an interesting one and very different from most caves in the country. There is still possibility of making additional discoveries in it.
History: Tolle S. Lemons Sr., entered the cave but he did not fully explore it .February 17, 1963: David McKenzie, Tom Phillips, Terry Raines and James Reddell explored and mapped the cave. September 1, 1963, Orion Knox, Tom Phillips and James Reddell, visited the cave again. August 21, 1987: Bill Elliot located the cave during a TSA volunteer work project. This was the first trip to Lemons Ranch in many years for cavers, just after TPWD purchased the property for a state park site. Bill located and flagged a small entrance on the north bank of Gorman Creek. The second entrance to the cave could not be located leaving doubt to this being Cicurina. December, 1987: During the second of the monthly TSA volunteer work trips cavers located the flagged entrance. The second entrance remained elusive. Another cave entrance in the area, more closely resembled the Cicurina description. January 9, 1988: Jay Jordan rappelled down the twenty foot drop into the cave, on an extremely cold weekend. Butch Fralia located the second entrance to the cave approximately 150 feet to the southeast identifying the cave as Cicurina. Cavers installed SAB018 identification tags at each entrance. Map: February 17, 1963: David McKenzie, Tom Phillips, Terry Raines and James Reddell surveyed the cave using Brunton & Tape Survey. Dick Smith plotted the data. Karl Kunath and Peggy Walkington drafted the map.
Biology: The cave is of some biological interest and harbors interesting species of troglodyte and troglophile. The common cave millipede (Cambala speobia) is extremely abundant throughout the cave. The troglophile spider (Achaearanea porteri) is also abundant. Its webs may be found throughout the main passage where they hang from walls and ceiling. A complete faunal list follows: Snails- not collected Millipedes- Cambala speobia (Chamberlin) - troglodyte Abacion ? texensis (Loomis) - accidental Centipedes- not collected Collembolans- Pseudosinella violenta (Folsom) - troglophile Odonata- Coenagrionidae - Telebasis ? salva (Hag.) accidental Spiders- Cicurina sp. (blind) - troglodyte Cicurina varians Gertsch and Mulaik - troglophile Achaearanea porteri (Banks) - troglophile Crickets- Ceuthophilus (Ceuthophilus) sp. - trogloxene C. (C.) secretus Scudder - trogloxene C. (Geotettix) cuniluclaris Hubbel - trogloxene Fleas- Pulex ? Simulans Baker - trogloxene Beetles- Carabidae - Bradycellus rupestris - ? troglophile Harpalus caliginosus F. - accidental Rhadine howeni (Barr and Lawrence) - troglophile Tachys (Tachyura) ferrugineus Dej. - troglophile Staphylinidae - Belonuchus sp., nr. moquinus Casey troglophile Biocrypth magnolia Blatchley - ? troglophile Lathrobium sp. - ? troglophile. Stilicolina condei Jarrige - troglophile Frogs- not collected Bats- Pipistrellus subflavus (Cuvier) - trogloxene Archaeology:
Bibliography: Reddell, J.R.1965. "A checklist of the cave fauna of Texas. I. The Invertebrata (exclusive of insecta)." Texas J. Sci., 17(2): 143-187. "A checklist of the cave fauna of Texas. II. Insecta." Texas J. Sci., 18(2): 25-56. "A checklist of the cave fauna of Texas. III. Vertebrata." Texas J. Sci., 19(2): 184-226. "A checklist of the cave fauna of Texas. IV. Additional records of Invertebrata (exclusive of Insecta)." Texas J. Sci., 21(4): 398-415. "A checklist of the cave fauna of Texas. V. Additional records of Insecta)." Texas J. Sci., 22(1): 47-65. Ref.: TSS files Colorado Bend State Park, work project trip reports.


Corral Crawl Cave (SAB 023)Length: 30'Depth: 0
Description: Corral Crawl Cave is a dry, dusty, 25 to 30 ft crawlway.
Map: Photography: Geology: Hydrology: Meteorology: Biology: Archaeology: Bibliography: Reddell, J.R., and J.H. Estes, eds. 1962: ,"The caves of San Saba County. Part I." Texas Speleological Survey, 1(6): 11.Ref.: TSS files


Corral Hole No. 2 (SAB 025) ,(Small Corral Hole)Length: 5'Depth: 15
History: Although originally reported by Bob Hudson to be a vertical pit requiring 75 ft of rope to enter, this hole was found in the approximate area shown on his location map. It is only about 15 ft deep and floored with silt. It was checked in 1962 by James Reddell, Stiles Roberts, and other members of the University of Texas Grotto. Description:
Bibliography: Reddell, J.R., and J.H. Estes, eds. 1962: , "The caves of San Saba County. Part I." Texas Speleological Survey, 1(6): 11.Ref.: TSS files


Corral Hole No. 3 (SAB 026) , ,Length: 5' ,Depth: 15'
History: Another of the Corral Holes reported by Bob Hudson to require 75 ft of rope to enter, this is only a fissure-like opening 15 ft deep and floored with silt. It was explored in 1962 by James Reddell, Stiles Roberts, and other members of the University of Texas Grotto. ,
Bibliography: ,Reddell, J.R., and J.H. Estes, eds. 1962: "The caves of San Saba County. Part I." Texas Speleological Survey, 1(6): 11. ,Ref.: TSS files


Crevice Cave (SAB 027) ,Length: 20' ,Depth: 90
Description: The cave is entered by a narrow fissure which drops about 20 ft to a slope. This in turn leads to a vertical drop of about 30 ft to a flat shelf. Here it intersects a perpendicular fissure which drops an additional 40 ft to the bottom of the cave.
History: This cave was explored in February 1962 by Bud Frank and Tom Phillips.
Bibliography: ,Reddell, J.R., and J.H. Estes, eds. 1962: "The caves of San Saba County. Part I." Texas Speleological Survey, 1(6): 11.Ref.: TSS files


Crowbar Cave (SAB 028) , ,Length: 25' ,Depth: 110' ,
Description: 6,The entrance to this cave was originally a small crevice blocked by large rocks. A crowbar was used to move the rocks, opening a hole large enough to enter. A 3 ft wide fissure drops 30 ft into a narrow room. From this room a 30 ft drop leads to the bottom of the cave, where fill blocks any possible leads. The maximum width attained by the cave at any point is 25 ft.
History: This cave was explored by Stiles Roberts, Bill Bell, and other members of The University of Texas Grotto in the spring of 1962.
Bibliography: Reddell, J.R., and J.H. Estes, eds. 1962: "The caves of San Saba County. Part I." Texas Speleological Survey, 1(6): 11. ,Ref.: TSS files


CRYSTAL CREVICE (SAB 029) , ,Length: 25' ,Depth: 10' ,
Description: The entrance to Crystal Crevice is located a few feet from the road to Lemons Fishing Camp and can be readily seen from the road. It is a fissure and drops down a few feet into a crevice- like passage about 25 feet long, about 2 to 3 feet wide, and up to 6 feet high. The walls are completely covered with large calcite crystals and the cave is therefore very attractive. The total depth is about 10 feet.
Bibliography: Ref.: TSS files.


DOVE CAVE (SAB 038) ,(Dave Cave) , ,Length: 30' ,Depth: 10
Description: The entrance is a 5 feet in diameter vertical sink dropping down a few feet to a slope which extends back about 25 to 30 feet as a passage 3 to 5 feet high and 5 to 6 feet wide. The cave is dry
History: The cave was originally reported by a hunter on the ranch and was explored on September 1, 1963, by James Reddell, David McKenzie and Orion Knox.
Biology: Fauna includes black-widow spider (Latrodectus mactans F.) other spiders (Agelenopsis aleenae Chamberlin and Ive), harvestmen, and cave crickets.
Bibliography: Anonymous. 1963: "Over 30 San Saba caves located." Texas Caver,8(9): 89-90.Reddell, J.R. 1965: "A checklist of the cave fauna of Texas. I. The Invertebrata (exclusive of Insecta)." Texas J. Sci.,17(2): 143-187. ,Ref.: TSS files


Copperhead Cave (SAB 046)Length: 75'Depth: 35
Description: Copperhead Cave is entered by an 8 ft by 15 ft sink with a steep silt and rock slope leading down about 15 ft. A crawl extends from the bottom of the sink. After about 10 ft the crawl opens into a 10 ft wide, 10 ft high passage sloping at 43 degrees d own for about 30 ft where it opens into a 25 ft long, 17 ft wide, 10 ft high room. The room is floored with mud containing numerous bones. Any passages which might continue are filled with silt. Total depth of the cave is about 35 ft.
History: The cave was explored by James Reddell and other members of the University of Texas Grotto in the spring of 1962.
Map: The cave was mapped on June 7, 1970 by Jimmy Schroeder, Berry Hawkins, and Tom Pack
Biology: The only fauna observed were cave crickets, ticks, a few bats, and thousands of fleas. It is known locally as Copperhead Cave because of its rumored use as a copperhead den.
,Bibliography: ,Reddell, J.R., and J.H. Estes, eds. 1962: "The caves of San Saba County. Part I." Texas Speleological Survey, 1(6): 11. ,Ref.: : TSS files ,9360


GORMAN CAVE (SAB 054) Length: 3000' Depth: 10'
Gorman cave is one of the best known and most frequently visited caves in the state. It has probably been locally known since the 1860's. Apparently authentic dates as early as 1876 may be found in the cave. The earliest written report on the cave appeared in the First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Texas, 1889. Since this is one of the earliest reported cave explorations in Texas the account of it is reprinted in its entirety:
"Caves are very numerous in the limestone of the Carboniferous and some of them are very extensive . . . I entered only one of them, and traversed it about three-fourths of a mile. Sometimes the roof would be high overhead, and then again we would have to crawl upon our hands and knees. There were lateral openings at different places, but we kept in the main opening. Most of the way the bottom was dry, but here and there a pool of water would be found standing in a basin of calcareous rock. Stalagmites covered the floor and stalactites hung from the top. We came to a place where there was a descent of the bottom of the cave for several feet, and lowering our candles into the opening, found on account of the gas they would not burn, so we retraced our way to the entrance." (Cummins, 1889)
The cave has been visited numerous times by local people and by visitors to the Gorman Falls Fishing Camp. As a result there has been considerable vandalism, and much debris has been left in the cave. The cave was among the first to be discovered by organized spelunkers in Texas. Riggs (1951) reports its discovery by the newly formed University of Texas Cave Club. Since that time the cave has been visited by most of the cavers in Texas and is a regular site of grotto trips. Some of these have been recorded, but most have gone unnoticed. The cave was mapped by the University of Texas Grotto in 1954, but a more detailed and accurate map of the cave was prepared by the Dallas-Fort Worth Grotto in September 1960. Detail and cross sections were added to the map b y James Redell. The underwater passage was partially explored in March 1962 by Tom Phillips and other members of the University of Texas Grotto. Further explorations of the underwater passage were made on August 24, 1962, by George Yeary and Norman Robins on. In November, 1987, Volunteer research cavers began working on the park and through August, 1993, visited the cave on numerous occasions. In February, 1992, a bat gate was installed approximately eight-hundred feet inside the cave. Bat gates are common on caves but this is believed to be the first of it's kind, located as far as it is inside the cave. On several occasions, cavers have removed all trash from the cave - i.e. bottles, cans, etc. After each occasion, visitors, probably arriving in boats on the river, have entered the cave and left deposits of more trash.
Description: Gorman Cave is located in a bluff on the west side of the Colorado River. A narrow steep-walled gully leads from the narrow flood plain and into the mouth of the cave. Large breakdown blocks litter the floor of the gully, indicating a ceiling collapse. The entrance itself is about ten feet high and fifteen feet wide. Immediately inside, the passage becomes somewhat wider. The walls of the entrance room are covered with massive calcite crystals with faces up to two inches a cross. Although coated with mud, many of them have been chipped away by vandals, leaving beautiful crystal faces exposed. After about seventy-five feet, the passage drops to a hands and knees crawl for about ten feet before the passage opens back up. Immediately after the crawl a breakdown slope on the left connects with a depression on the surface; this depression is located at the base of a short cliff about fifty feet above the level of the cave entrance. The opening i n this depression has been enlarged by digging to allow the cave resident bats an easier entrance. After the crawl, the cave opens to a twenty foot wide, twenty foot high passage floored with river sand and gravel. To the right are some of the more obvious of the caves formations. A large flowstone rises from the floor to smaller formations. During recent years, the flowstone and formations have taken on new growth. Several small travertine dams have formed pools, and fish ponds, which lie across the cave passage. River perch and catfish have been found in these ponds after rises of the Colorado River inundated this part of the cave. About two-hundred feet past the fish ponds, an elliptical stream passage is reached with a high crack on the left side of the passage. After a sharp turn to the left, the Bath Tub, a low, wide circular pool of water, may be seen on the left. A ceiling drop occurs shortly after this and immediately after this drop in ceiling height the passage opens into the Big Room. This is a forty foot wide, fifty foot high, one-hundred foot long domed room floored with guano and gravel. The room is inhabited by a small colony of bats during the summer. A winding stream passage extends from the Big Room about two-hundred feet, bypassing a small side passage which ends after one-hundred feet in the Mouse Room. Just beyond the Mouse Room, a bat gate has been installed. After the bat gate, at the end of the dry stream passage is an area known as Separation Lake. This area ranges from dry, to a one to two feet deep pool of water. During and immediately after a resurgence, Separation Lake floods to the ceiling. In the past, this lake was inhabited by numerous crayfish. Gravel banks on the sides of the pool contain quartzite sand and quartz pebbles. About one-hundred feet beyond Separation Lake, the first of a series of holes drops into a lower level stream passage containing running water. Here and for the next few hundred feet much breakdown has occurred, making it necessary to climb over and around the large blocks. Immediately after the breakdown area is a fork in the passage: the passage to the left dead ends after about one-hundred feet. The passage to the right extends to more breakdown, which can be climbed over or beside the main passage. Beyond this breakdown area there is another junction formed by a large mass of flowstone. A passage above the flowstone leads through deep mud, while that to the left extends through a narrow crack to meet the upper passage in the summer. A squeeze out of this passage leads to a large passage. To the left it slopes downwards, becoming a narrow winding tube containing pools up to eight feet deep. After about one-hundred feet a small stream enters from the left and extends another few hundred feet before siphoning; the upstream part of the passage also siphons. To the right the main passage extends as a large stream passage floored with flowstone and rock. A thirty foot in diameter lake, containing water several feet deep, may b e bypassed on the right by means of a crawl. From here a large winding stream passage, CO2 Alley, extends for several hundred feet before encountering the same fugitive stream seen earlier. To the right(downstream) the passage soon becomes to small to negotiate, while to the left (upstream) it is seen as a six to eight feet deep siphon. An underwater passage extends past one small air pocket into the first Air Room. A walking passage about one-hundred-fifty feet long extends from here to a second siphon, which has not been explored. Several maps have been drawn of this cave. The published map is in "The Caves of , Second Edition." Gorman Cave is formed in the Ellenburger Group. Although not fully understood, the speleogenesis of this extremely important cave is interesting. Apparently formed in the phreatic zone, as evidenced by ceiling pendants and solution pockets through the cave, especially in the area known as the Swiss Cheese, the cave shows evidence of complete or near-complete clay filling in an early stage of its development. The cave was also filled at this or possibly and earlier time by breakdown and gravel, remnants of which may be seen in the floor, walls an ceiling. Some of the gravel and breakdown is locally cemented by calcite. At this stage, the down cutting of the Colorado River dissected the cave, which became an outlet source for a stream. The extension of the Cave on the east side of the river is now a narrow, steep walled gully with no open cave extending from it's head. This part of the cave presumably has been filled with mud and sealed by breakdown. After the down cutting of the river had opened the cave, a stream began removing the clay and cemented fill. The source of the water for this stream is presumed to be the numerous small caves and fissures lying above the cave. Almost certainly related to Gorman Cave is Clark's Branch Well Cave, lying in a direct line with the main trend of Gorman Cave and less than a mile distant from the end of Gorman Cave. With the collapse of portions of the cave walls and ceiling, the stream running through the cave found it easier to utilize several small side passages which still serve as the channel for the cave stream. The main passage is frequently flooded in times of heavy rain when the cave stream becomes too large to limit itself to the small side passages it usually uses. Some flooding also occurs in the first half of the cave when the Colorado River is in flood. One such flood described by Beck (1970). Of no small interest are the large calcite crystals found on the walls and ceiling of parts of the cave, as well as quartzite sand and sandstone, are quite unusual in Texas caves, and a full study of this cave and its sediments is badly needed. During periods of heavy rainfall, the cave will resurge. Water levels rise at the back sump and flow through CO2 Alley. It then flows through a lower passage to come out at sumps in the squeeze area. The resurgence appears to bypass the area between the squeeze and CO2 alley all together. This can be ascertained by observing the period between the Squeeze and CO2 Alley. This area is very muddy and holds water for long periods of time. Since 1988 , the area has gradually been drying out. There have been several resurgence between 1990 and 1993 and the area keeps getting drier. Since the Volunteer Cave Research project began in 1987, numerous air quality measurements have been taken. CO2 and O2 measurements have been taken throughout the cave. The greatest accumulations of CO2 occur in the area known as CO2 Alley. Accumulations in this area have reach as much as six-percent though five-percent are more typical. As would be expected, the variations are seasonal and are affected by weather changes such as heavy rainfall. It is observed that rainfall has a greater effect than seasonal temperatures. In December, 1990, measurements were taken immediately after local temperature had fallen to 0o F. The CO2 decreased from five-percent (the previous measurement) to four-percent. After a large rainfall that caused the cave to resurge, CO2 dropped from five-percent to two-percent in the CO2 Alley area. Heavy rainfall has washed all but a few small accumulations of decaying vegetation from the cave. The accumulations remaining do not seem adequate to generate the amount of CO2 typically present in the cave. Biology: Biological collections were made in the cave on October 19, 1962, and on March 15, 1963, by James Reddell and David McKenzie. "Blind crayfish" reported from this cave are almost certainly white individuals of the common speci es, Procambarus simulans simulans. These frequently lose their pigment as an apparent result of absence of carotin in their diet. Additional collections are badly needed in this extremely interesting and biologically significant cave. A faunal li st of identified material follows: SnailsHelicodiscus eigenmanni Pilsbry - troglophile IsopodsAsellus bisetus Steeves - troglobite AmphipodsStygonectes bifurcatus Holsinger - troglobite S. russelli Holsinger Holsinger - troglobite CrayfishProcambarus simulans simulans (Faxon) - troglophile MillipedsCambala speobia (Chamberlin) - troglobite SpidersCicurina sp. - troglobite C. varians gertsch and Mulaik - troglophile Meioneta sp. - troglophile CollembolansPseudosinella violenta (Folsom) - troglophile CricketsCeuthophilus (Geotettix) cunicluaris Hubbell - trogloxene MosquitoesAedes, poss. vexans (Meigen) - trogloxene BeetlesCarabidae - Tachys (Tachyura) ferrugineus Dej. - Troglophile Pselaphidae - Cylindrarctus sp. - troglophile Staphylinidae- Belonuchus sp. nr. moquinus Casey - troglophile Orus (Leucorus) rubens Casey - troglophile or trogloxene Stilicolina condei Jarrige - troglophile RingtailBassariscus astutus flavus Rhoads - trogloxene >Also observed but not collected were flies, centipedes, bats, frogs, and mites.


LEMONS RANCH CAVE (SAB 073) Length: 750'Depth: 100'
Description: The entrance to Lemons Ranch Cave is a eight foot diameter sink along one side of a draw. Entry into the cave requires climbing down about fifteen feet. There are hand and foot holds, all the way down but they are difficult to see. At the bottom of the entrance, a sloping passage leads down into a junction room. 6,In the junction room, there are two passages to the left and right of the main passage. To the left a narrow one foot high passage ends after about ten feet. To the right a six to ten foot wide, one foot high crawl extends twenty foot before ending. The main passage continues as a stoopway over rubble to a second junction. ,In the second junction room, passage separates to the left and the right. To the right passage opens into a very wide irregular mud-floored room about thirty feet in diameter and up to six feet high. There is a mud-floored crawl passage leading from the room to a blind pit about sixty feet deep. 4,From the second junction room, the left-hand passage forms the main passage of the cave. It leads down through a one foot high, three foot wide, steep chimney. This passage extends as a one to three foot high crawl for about thirty feet. After an additional thirty feet it opens into a five to ten foot wide, three to five foot high passage. This passage has a narrow, usually dry stream channel cut into the floor. After about 160 feet the ceiling height increases to six to nine feet and passage width in places to fifteen feet. After about 100 feet the passage ends in a twenty foot high dome and a flowstone block. The stone block becomes partially choked by mud after about ten feet. Digging extended this crawl but additional work will be required before passing the flowstone block. A strong air current issues from the crawl and it should eventually lead back down to the main passage. The main stream passage contains several areas of formations, including many stalactites and some helectites. (See map Caves of San Saba County).
History: 9,October 13, 1962: James Reddell, Tom phillips and other members of the University of Texas Grotto visited the cave. This is the first known visit by organized cavers. In the passage leading back to the pit they found two handwritten notes. One undated note read: "Turn back. It's not worth it. Passage ends in vertical sink. W.J. Pruitt, David Walker, Dick Walker, Glen Price. Sink is 60 ft. - 75 ft. No features at bottom." The second note read:
"June 10, 1961 - we explored this hole to here searching for a new entrance to Gorman Cave.
Johnette Matthews Age 14Jim Sutter Age 15 , Route 3 Post Office Box 211 , Lampasas, TexasLampasas, Texas Robin Matthews Age 18Doyle Roper Age 17 , 4706 Shadow Lane1907 Aggie Lane , Austin, Texas Austin
Texas September 1, 1963: James Reddell, Orion Knox and David McKenzie visited the cave. July 18, 1964: Bill Russell and other members of the University of Texas Grotto visited the cave. November 1965: Ed Alexander, Jonathan Davis, Charles Jennings, Hugh Davis and Charles Loving surveyed the cave. , 1,November 1987: Cavers "rediscovered" the cave during the monthly TSA volunteer work project at CBSP. Terry Holsinger located the cave. Re-exploration has occurred since then. Joe Ivy has attempted to explore possible leads around the sink area at the back of the cave. None of the so called leads have proven to be worth further pursuit. November, 1988: John Brooks and Jay Jordan, performed a line survey in the cave. They came up with 750 feet of passage indicating the cave was never completely mapped. The old records show the cave to be 550+ feet long
Map: November 1965: C. Loving, C. Jennings, E. Alexander, and J. Davis surveyed the cave using brunton and tape. The published map is in the TSS survey titled The Caves of San Saba County.
Biology: Collections of invertebrates were made in the cave on October 13, 1962, by James Reddell; on September 1, 1963, by James Reddell and David McKenzie; and on July 18, 1964, by Bill Russell. The cave is dry, but it does contain three troglodyte species. Additional collections should yield other species of interest. A complete faunal list follows: Millipedes- Cambala speobia (Chamberlin) - troglophile ,Spiders- Cicurina sp. - Troglodyte ,- C. varians Gertsch and Mulaik - troglophile ,- Meioneta sp. - troglophile ,Phalangids- Mesosoma roeweri Goodnight and Goodnight - accidental ,Thysanurans- Nicoletia texensis Ulrich - troglodyte ,Crickets- Ceuthophilus (Ceuthophilus) sp. - trogloxene ,- Ceuthophilus (Ceuthophilus) secretus Scudder - , trogloxene ,Beetles- Caribdae - Rhadine howdeni (Bart and Lawrence) - , troglophile ,- Tachys (Tachyura) ferrugineus Dej. - troglophile
Bibliography: Anonymous.1965. "Grotto news: University of Texas Grotto, N.S.S." Texas Caver 10(11): 222 ,Reddell, J.R.1965. "A checklist of the cave fauna of Texas. I. The Invertebrata (exclusive of insecta)" Texas J. Sci., 17(2): 143-187 ,Reddell, J.R.1966. "A checklist of the cave fauna of Texas. II Insecta." Texas J. Sci., 18(1): 25-56.,Reddell, J.R.1969. "A checklist of the cave fauna of Texas. IV. Additional records of Invertebrata (exclusive of Insecta)." Texas J. Sci., 21(4): 389-415.Ref.: TSS files. Colorado Bend Volunteer TSA project trip reports and notes.


LEMONS COON CAVE (SAB 074) Length: 30'Depth: 20 :
Description: An elongated 10 foot by 15 foot sink leads down a slope for a vertical distance of 20 feet where it opens into an elongated breakdown-floored room 15 feet high, 15 feet wide and about 30 feet long. A raccoon was seen in a narrow dead-end passage leading from one end of the room. The cave was visited on September 1, 1963 by James Reddell, Orion Knox and David McKenzie.
Map: Sketch map is adequate for this small cave
.Biology: Spiders, Harvestman and crickets were observed inhabitants of the cave. A raccoon was also seen in the cave when it was visited in September 1963.
Bibliography: Ref.: TSS files.


LEMONS RANCH FISSURE (SAB 075)Length: 20'Depth: 30
Description: This is the only obviously negotiable fissure in a fairly extensive fissure complex located near the bed of an old abandoned railroad. It consists of an elongated entrance about 10 feet long and 3 feet wide which drops unclimbably for about 30 feet. It extends a short distance in one direction as walking passage but then it slopes down and becomes very tight and has not been explored further. Many other fissures exist in this heavily wooded area and some may lead to caves.
History: The cave was explored in 1962 by James Reddell and Tom Phillips.
: Bibliography: Ref.: TSS files


Little Bad Air Hole (SAB 076) Length: 10' Depth: 30'
Description: A 1 ft wide, 3 ft long crack drops 30 ft into a slightly elongated fissure 2 ft wide and 10 ft long at the bottom. The walls are smooth and the presence of bad air made the climb very difficult without equipment. The floor is of soil and there are no formations. A carbide lamp would not burn 10 ft from the floor.
History: The cave was explored September 1, 1963, by James Reddell, David Mckinzie, and Orion Knox.
Biology: Harvestman and Cave Crickets were observed.
Bibliography: ,Anonymous.1963. " Over 30 San Saba caves located." Texas Caver, 8(9): 89-90. Ref.: TSS files


LOWER CAVE (SAB 079) Length: 50'Depth: 20'
History: It was visited on September 2, 1963 by James Reddell and Bill Russell. Description: The entrance to Lower Cave is an irregular breakdown sink on the side of a shallow draw. A crawl down leads into an area of several low rooms. The cave is essentially unexplored and may be fairly extensive.
Bibliography: ,Ref.: TSS files.


MIDDLE CAVE (SAB 083) Length: 100'Depth: 35
Description: A sink entrance leads down about 15 feet to a passage extending two ways. Downstream it leads as a narrow crawl containing formations to an unclimbable drop of about 20 feet. Upstream a low bedding-plane crawl floored with silt extends for at least 5 0 feet with no sign of an end. The cave is very promising and should be carefully explored
History: It was visited on September 2, 1963 by James Reddell and Bill Russell.
Biology: A beetle, Rhadine howdeni (Barr and Lawrence) was collected in the cave
: Bibliography: ,Reddell, J.R.1966. "A checklist of the cave fauna of Texas. II. Insecta." Texas J. Sci., 18(1): 25-56.Ref.: TSS files


SOUR CAVE (SAB 099) Length: 50' ,Depth: 20
Description: The entrance to Sour Cave is a tight crevice about 20 feet deep. At the bottom a duck-under leads into a low passage about 30 feet long. This opens into an irregular room 4 feet to 6 feet high and about 15 feet in diameter. Several passages extend from this room, one of which leads to another tight fissure entrance. The cave is not well-explored and should be mapped. It was visited on October 14, 1962 by James Reddell, Terry Raines and Tom Phillips.
Bibliography: Ref.: TSS files.


SWEET CAVE (SAB 105) Length: 50' ,Depth: 20
Description: Located in the same area of fissures as Sour Cave, the entrance to Sweet Cave is a narrow fissure dropping 15 feet to 20 feet. A crawl from the bottom leads into a 6 foot high room about 20 feet in diameter and containing several formations. Leads from this room have not been checked, but are promising. It was visited on October 14, 1962 by James Reddell, Terry Raines and Tom Phillips
Bibliography: Ref.: TSS files.


TURTLE SHELL CAVE (SAB 108)Length: 50'Depth: 20
Description: Turtle Shell Cave is a single main room enterable from two entrances. One entrance is a fissure about two feet wide and five feet long. The other entrance is a tight crevice ten inches wide and two feet long. Both are about twenty feet deep. The single room is about thirty feet in diameter and two to five feet high. Opposite the main entrance a circular chimney slopes steeply down for a total of about fifty feet before ending in a short crawl.
History: October 13, 1962: Tom Phillips, Terry Raines and James Reddell explored the cave. They found a turtle shell on the floor giving the cave its name. ,After the winter rains of 1992, cavers noted two small, low, passages have opened. These passages previously did not exist. They were apparently plugged and heavy water flow opened them. They have not been explored.
Biology: A small collection of invertebrates included a blind millipede, Cambala speobia (Chamberlin), an epigeon millipede, Narceus amaricanus (Beauvios), and collembolans, Pseudosinella violenta (Folsom).
Bibliography: ,: I0,0,2160,2160 ,Reddell, J.R.1965. "A checklist of the cave fauna of Texas. I. The Invertebrata (exclusive of Insecta)." Texas J. Sci. 17(2): 143-187.Ref.: TSS files.


UPPER CAVE (SAB 112) Length: 100'+Depth: 20
Description: The entrance to Upper Cave is a fissure about three feet wide and fifteen feet long. It drops about fifteen feet where it intersects a low wide crawl extending in both directions. Neither way has been checked for more than fifty feet, but it continue s and may be fairly long.
History: September 2, 1963: James Reddell and Bill Russell checked the cave. A small biological collection was made
Biology Five Species of invertebrate have been identified from Upper Cave. A blind millipede, Cambala speobia (Chamberlin) is the only troglobite known to the cave. Other fauna includes a spider, Cicurina varians Gertsch and Mulaik, two carabid beetles, Rhad ine howdeni (Barr and Lawrence) and Tachys (Tachyura) ferrugineus Dej., and a staphylinid beetle, Belonuchus sp. nr. moquinus casey. All four of these species are troglophiles.
Bibliography: ,Ref.: : TSS Files Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


Dagger Cave (SAB 134)Length: 38'Depth: 27
Description: The main entrance to Dagger Cave is a crevice 11.5 ft long and 4 ft wide which drops 27 ft to a floor of a small rocks. A second entrance about 2 ft in diameter is located about 10 ft away which drops down a very step slope of rubble. Equipment is required. At the bottom a 10 ft passage extends down a small slope for about 20 ft, passing beneath one 20 ft high dome and then ending abruptly at the base of a dome which must reach almost to the surface. The cave is formed along a joint striking S52 degrees 30' W and is a total of 38 ft long.
History: This cave was explored and mapped on March 29, 1970, by Jimmy Schroeder and D. Bettinger.
Biology: Bones were observed on the floor.
Bibliography: Ref.: TSS Files.


DEVILS STAIRCASE (SAB 151)Length: 15'Depth: 20
Description: This is apparently one of the fissures making up the McLarrin fissure System. The entrance is 15 ft long and 20 ft deep. A passage 100 ft long extends S 48 degrees W from the bottom.
Biology: Bones were observed on the floor.
Bibliography: Ref.: James Jasek


DYNAMITE CAVE (SAB 152) Length: 150'Depth: 15
Description: There are two entrances to the cave, a small vertical chimney approximately 150 feet to the west of the main entrance. The main entrance is a large friendly sinkhole approximately fifteen feet long and twelve feet deep at the deepest point. Entrance to the cave requires stepping down to a ledge about four feet lower than the surface. Reaching the floor of the sink requires a step down about three feet lower. The floor of the sinkhole is a gentle slope leading to the entrance of the cave. Entrance requires hands and knees crawl for about six feet. Once inside the cave is a long room with ceiling heights six to ten feet high and perhaps 100 feet long. There are a few dry formations and the floor is of dry loose dirt. At the back of the room is a climbable chimney that goes straight up and returns to the surface. Map: Sketch map has no north arrow or map scale, but may be adequate for this small cave. November 12, 1988, Pooch Amy, Dave Finfrock, Mike Goff, and Ken Larson surveyed the cave. The two entrances each has a survey benchmark installed. There isn't an available map of the cave.
History: ,February 17, 1972: James Jasek and Jimmy Schroeder visited the cave. ,September 11, 1988: During the monthly TSA volunteer work project, Jim Schroeder happened to visit the park office while project cavers were there. Jim is an old time caver of the Lemons Ranch. He led Terry Holsinger to the cave and related other caving information about the area. ,October 8, 1988: Cavers visit the cave and verify it to be Dynamite Cave. ,August, 1990: Butch Fralia and Danny Sherrod visited Robert Lemons. Mr. Lemons stated time exaggerate the story of the 300 sticks of dynamite. Mr. Leroy Yarborough, former publisher of "VANISHING TEXAS," a historical magazine first related the tale. He suggests the amount of dynamite to have been less than the story. Robert was at the fishing camp when the even reportedly took place. Tolle Lemons and Robert's brothers did the blasting. He thinks the amount would have been more like a maximum of five to six sticks. 4,The story relates that Dynamite Cave was originally a narrow fissure entered only by the skinniest of people. The Lemons were treasure hunters and felt Dynamite Cave had to be the site of the mother lode. They managed to get 300 sticks of dynamite into the cave and convinced a skinny girlfriend of one son to drop into the cave and set caps. Ignition of the dynamite, yielded a large friendly entrance, a nice cave with eight foot ceilings but no gold. The name originated derived from the means of creating the entrance.
Biology: Two Buzzard chicks were observed in the cave during the summer of 1989. Christmas 1989, a Raccoon was found nesting in the cave. A large quantity of Cave Crickets and Harvestman reside in the cave.
Bibliography: Ref.: James Jasek. Colorado Bend Volunteer Project Trip Reports. Robert Lemons.


LEMONS PIT (SAB 160)Length: 12'Depth: 15'
Description: This small single chamber room cave is located along a long abandoned railroad. It is on the side of a hill some 100 yards from the railroad. The entrance is 4 feet in diameter and drops 15 feet to a small round room about 8 feet high and 12 feet in diameter. A small passage too small to enter leads from the room.
History: It was visited February 27, 1972 by James Jasek and Jimmy Schroeder.
Bibliography: Ref.: James Jasek


A "MOTHER PIT" (SAB 161) ,Length: 10' ,Depth: 30
Description: The entrance to this cave is a very narrow crack which drops 30 feet into a small 10 foot in diameter room. Equipment is required to enter this pit.
History: ,June 1971; visited by James Jasek and B. Trippet
Bibliography: Ref.: James Jasek Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


VARMINT TRAP CAVE (SAB 178) Length: Depth: 75' +/-
History: February 13, 1988; The cave was located by David McClung during the monthly TSA volunteer work project. The cave was entered the same day by Jeff Duvall, Keith Heuss, and David McClung. Description: David McClung explored the full extent of the cave while other cavers remained at various levels. A very old trap was found in the lower part of the cave, giving it it's name. Other pieces of trash are evident in the cave but there was no evidence of prior visitation to the cave. (K. Heuss 3/88)
Map: ,A sketch map was drawn from memory by David McClung after he exited the cave
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


Sore Toe Cave (SAB 179) Length: Depth:
Description: The entrance is located in a sink. The entrance drop is a 20 foot chimney 4 or 5 feet in diameter. A unentered pit estimated to be about 45 foot deep is to one side of the floor of the entrance pit. (Alvis Hill, 11/88)
Map: Photography: Geology: Hydrology: Meteorology: Biology:
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, work project trip reports, notes.


SKUNK HOLE (SAB 180) Length: Depth:
History: November 10, 1989: During the regularly scheduled TSA volunteer work project, Keith Heuss and Wayne Hill had arrived early and installed a bench mark at SAB 180. They noted a skunk in the area and named the cave, "Skunk Hole."
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


Parsley Pit (SAB181) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Horseshoe Chimney (SAB182) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Gorman Creek Crevice (SAB183) Length: 3036' 'Depth: 98'


BLUE RIBBON FISSURE (SAB 184) Length: Depth:
Description: Trip date: December 4-6, 1987 2,We proceeded on to the unnamed expected 75 foot deep pit we located on the previous trip from a lead from Steve Densmore. Butch and Jarvis entered the cave first. With hopes of a promising lead, Rune and I entered the pit. A 13.5 foot chimney lead s to a ledge which divides the fissure room into two pits, both of which lead to the same room. The larger passage is easier to negotiate. Down another 29.5 feet is the floor of the fissure room. A hole to one side of this dirt and rock sloping floored room leads into a canyon passage. Exploration beyond this point was stopped due to bad air at a level about half way down this 5 foot tall hole. Rope and fresh air will be required before further exploration will be possible. Air quality measurements were taken by hanging a sensor into the canyon passage at the bottom of the hole. Oxygen content measurements were taken using a MDA Scientific, Inc. model 330 oxygen analyzer with a sensor probe at the end of a 6 foot cable. Carbon Dioxide content was measured within a Draeger Multi Gas Detector using a Draeger Detector tube to measure carbon dioxide. Its sensor is on the end of a 10 foot tube resulting in measurements being taken lower in the pit. Oxygen was measured at 14 .5 percent (21 percent being normal), and carbon dioxide measured at 8.25 percent (0.035 percent being normal). Recommended low level for oxygen content is 19.5 percent for breathable environment. Outside air temperature on the day the readings were taken was the upper 70's. Hopes are that cold weather will clear the bad air out later in the winter.
Bibliography: Ref.:


ICOTTA RAZOR RIFT (SAB 185) Length: 87.26m Depth: 17.24m (map)
Description: Ricotta Razor Rift is a system formed along a fault or joint with one fissure entrance and one sink hole collapse entrance. The fissure entrance drops about 6 feet to a tight spot - a square hole in breakdown about 2 feet in diameter. Below the hole is a small room from which a fissure extends in the same trend as the entrance toward the other entrance. Dropping through the fissure is some what difficult as the fissure is only about 1 foot wide and drops 8 to 10 feet. From the bottom of the fissure opens a room about 25 feet long by approximately 10 feet wide. At the opposite end of the room, a fissure (same trend) leads upward and connects with the sinkhole collapse entrance. The floor has another tight fissure (same trend again) which runs almost the length of the room. At one end of the fissure it is passable at about 1 foot wide and drops about 12 feet. It opens at the bottom onto an 8 foot climb down into a fairly extensive room. Average ceiling height is about 5 1/2 feet. The room is feistly maze-like and goes in numerous directions though infeesling crawls on the floor of the room, a flowstone covered pit drops 6 to 7 feet to a small room with a tight belly-crawl extending off. The cave is tight in several places and is technically difficult. (Joe Ivy, 3/13/88).
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


NAPOLITAS Cave (SAB 186) Length: 74' Depth: 30
Description: The cave was named Napolitas (cactus fruit) Cave, for the prickly pear cactus growing at one edge of the entrance fissure. It is entered by a eleven foot chimneyable vertical fissure. An entrance room offset from the surface entrance by about five feet has multiple passages extending from it. This room is almost cylindrical, about five feet in diameter. Across the room from the entrance, a small pit 1.6 feet deep leads to a passage two feet tall that extends at 210o azimuth for 19.6 feet and has three leads off the end. This lead is considered beautiful because of the erosion of micro-fractures on the walls. The first lead to the left and at the end of the passage is two feet wide, 1.5 feet tall, extends 2.6 feet before becoming mud filled. The other two passages are one foot high and one foot wide and quickly mud choke. Thirteen feet into this passage, a 1.5 foot wide passage to the right leads 6.5 feet to a small pit that drops down into a passage parallel to the main passage. The length of the passage is described as "coffin" length.
History: August 13, 1988: The cave was surveyed during the monthly TSA volunteer work project by Mike Cagle, Corky Corcoran, Jay Jordan, Dennis and Joshua Thompson. April 8, 1995: TSA Cave Research Volunteers, Peter Baron, Butch Fralia, Chris Jagge, Sharon Mastbrook, and Tina Schmid, visited the cave to gather data for a more detailed description.
Biology: White sightless millipedes were observed in the cave. Some were being eaten by small spiders in the cave.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


UNNAMED CAVE (SAB 187) Length: 20' ,Depth: 25
Description: A vertical crevice entrance about 4 feet by 2 feet at its widest narrows to 16 inches by 10 inches at one point. A small scrub oak tree growing out of the entrance to one side had to be trimmed before the pit could be entered. A room about 20 feet in diameter is located About 25 feet below the surface. A pile of breakdown about 4 feet high in this room has its high center below the pit entrance. The cave is not located in a creek so as to take much water. What water does enter the cave obviously drains into the breakdown. A lead in the breakdown may continue with some digging, but a large boulder covers any entrance. (Alvis Hill 11/88).
History: ,March 12, 1988; The cave was found by Keith Heuss during an overland survey between two caves in the area. The cave was tied into the overland survey and is accurately located. Rocks dropped in the cave at the time revealed some depth to the pit. November 12, 1988; The cave was entered for the first time by Bill Larsen and Alvis Hill. The cave was explored to a depth of about 25 feet. Biological collections from the cave were destroyed by a large boulder when it dislodged and slid down the breakdown slope. The boulder now blocks a possible lead in the cave. (Keith Heuss 11/88)
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


MYSTERY HOLE CAVE (SAB188) Length: 114' ,Depth: 24
Description: The cave is approximately 114 feet long by 24 feet deep. The passage narrows to a mud fill to low to negotiate. Beyond the mud fill, 15 feet more of passage can be seen before it rounds a bend. A small mouse was observed walking along a ledge near th e end of the cave. Air quality about half way down the 6 foot deep entrance drops to 18% oxygen and holds constant to the end of the cave. The entrance is covered the entrance with rocks
History: ,November, 1988; Clay Chambers, Keith Heuss, Jay Jordan, and Dave McClung installed a brass screw bench mark near the entrance then surveyed the cave.
Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


UNNAMED CAVE (SAB 189) Length: Depth:
Description:
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


CAVITY CREEP CAVE (SAB 190) Length: 114' Depth: 70'
Description:
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


MM HOLE (SAB 191) Length: Depth:
Description
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


MOUSE HOLE CAVE (SAB 192) Length: Depth: 60
Description: Joe Ivy, Allan Cobb, Linda Palit and Dave Milhollin entered and bottomed out Mouse Hole. Total estimated depth is about 20 meters (60 feet). A mouse size hole is an obvious water drain at the bottom of the cave. A fissure passage takes a healthy amount of air but is only a few inches wide. They mapped their way out of the cave. A mouse was observed in the cave, from which the cave earned its name on the first visit to the cave.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


UNNAMED CAVE (SAB 193) Length: 4'Depth: 12
Description: A small vertical cave in Gorman Creek near SAB218 (Blue Fungus Cave), and SAB194 (Sore Back Cave). The pit entrance is covered by a large rock. Two holes, one about ten inches in diameter and another about 12 inches by 2 feet lead under the rock to t he top of the pit. The pit is twelve feet deep with a small passage three feet wide by four feet long. The floor is dirt covered from soil washed in from the surface. A twelve inch by eight inch hole in the floor at passage end provides water drainage from the cave. At various times the hole terminates with dirt fill but after a heavy rain, this may be washed out and the hole seen to continue for a short distance before disappearing under rock.
History: November 1988: Alvis Hill, with the TSA Cave Research Volunteer Project, explored the cave and provided a preliminary description. Part of the root system of a nearby tree blocked the entrance and was trimmed to facilitate entrance. April 8, 1995: TSA Cave Research Volunteers, Peter Baron, Butch Fralia, Chris Jagge, Sharon Mastbrook, and Tina Schmid, visited the cave to gather data for a more detailed description.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


SORE BACK CAVE (SAB 194) Length: 25' Depth: 10
Description: The surface expression for Sore Back Cave is a fifteen foot long, three foot wide (widest point) fissure trending south to north. A small passage leads downward in the north end of the fissure. The entrance passage leads downward in a southerly direction for about ten feet. At the bottom is an intersection room, an enlargement of the passage tall enough to stand in. A passage to the abrupt right of the room is to tight to traverse. A left passage extends for about ten feet to a vertical fissure pass age leading down. Very small people could continue downward in this passage.
History: August 13, 1988: The cave was surveyed by Clay Chambers, Jay Jordan and Dave McClung with the TSA Volunteer Cave Research Project. May 13, 1995: TSA Cave Research Volunteers, Nila Dennis, Butch Fralia, Benjamin Heuss, Keith Heuss, and Sharon Mastbrook, visited the cave to gather data for an enhanced description.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


UNNAMED CAVE (SAB 195) ,Length: Depth: Location:
Description
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


CENOTE DE CARNE (SAB 196) Length: 40'+Depth: 13'+
Description: The entrance is a cross shaped formed where two fissures meet perpendicularly. An 8 food chimney down leads to a wide room about 40 feet across with some ceiling heights of 4 feet. A small pit at one side of the room leads 5 feet down to sloping passage. This passage leads to a second room where a shallow pit sumps. The clear water contains some organic debris. On the other side of the 40 foot wide room, a small squeeze leads to a breakdown chamber. A strong airflow is noticed at this squeeze and across the breakdown chamber where a 6 foot tall room leads to a skylight which is too tight to negotiate. Many bones were observed throughout the cave, some were old and were well embedded in the flowstone deposited on the floor.
History: August 13, 1988: The cave was surveyed during the monthly TSA volunteer work project by Mike Cagle, Clay Chambers, Corky Corcoran, Jay Jordan, Dave McClung, Dennis and Joshua Thompson. May 13, 1995: TSA Cave Research Volunteers, Nila Dennis, Butch Fralia, Benjamin Heuss, Keith Heuss, and Sharon Mastbrook, visited the cave to gather data for an enhanced description.
Bibliography: ,Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


DOG & BUTTERFLY CAVE (SAB 197) Length: 17' Depth: 11
Description: The entrance to Dog and Butterfly Cave is a fissure ten feet long, one foot to five feet wide trending at 256o azimuth. The entrance drops eleven feet to a breakdown floor. Horizontal passage extends at 74o azimuth for seventeen feet. The passage floor drops six feet from the entrance to the end over it's seventeen foot length. A possible passage in the floor extends two feet before becoming to tight to traverse.
History: August 13, 1988: The cave was surveyed during the monthly TSA volunteer work project by Mike Cagle, Clay Chambers, Corky Corcoran, Jay Jordan, Dave McClung, Dennis and Joshua Thompson. April 8, 1995: TSA Cave Research Volunteers, Peter Baron, Butch Fralia, Chris Jagge, Sharon Mastbrook, and Tina Schmid, visited the cave to gather data for a more detailed description.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


UNNAMED CAVE (SAB 198) Length: Depth:
Description
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


DON'T FIT PIT (SAB 199) Length: Depth:
Description: A vertical crevice entrance measuring 1 foot by 2.5 feet located in a shallow sink which drops about 6 feet. A ledge offsets the drop before continuing down another 12 feet. A crevice trending northward continues about 20 feet but is about 10 inches wide is too tight to enter. To the south side of the floor, another drop continues an estimated 30 feet and is possibly chimneyable. Air quality readings taken about 6 feet into this pit indicate oxygen content of 14.8%. Exploration ended at the top of this pit. (Alvis Hill 11/88).
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


????? (SAB200) Length: ?'Depth: ?


CRIPPLED DEER CAVE (SAB 201) Length: 80'Depth: 55
Description: The two entrances to this cave are situated in an area of exposed karst in a wooded field. The southern entrance is a 2 foot by 10 foot chimney which drops about 10 feet. At the bottom, a crawlway trends due north toward a second entrance but is impassable. A second fissure passage trends west but is also impassable. The second entrance is located about 15 feet due north of the first entrance. 2,The second entrance leads to a chimneyable crevice about 2 feet wide dropping about 20 feet to a small room. Two passages each about 40 feet in length, lead off this room. The passage to the south leads towards the first entrance. Some formations and a dome about 10 feet high are found in this passage. A room 15 feet by 20 feet with a 2 foot high ceiling leads off to one side of the entry room. An estimated 35 foot deep pit drops from this room but was not entered. Air quality readings taken about 6 feet into the top of this pit indicated oxygen levels of 13.2%. A stream passage can be seen at the bottom of the pit and may be a continuation of the cave. Air quality readings in the rest of the cave were no worse than 20% oxygen content during t his trip to the cave in November 1988. ,From the entry room, the other 40 foot long passage may be traversed for about 5 feet before becoming to tight. (Alvis Hill, 11/88).
Photography: Several entrance and entrance area photographs were taken by Keith Heuss during November 1988.
History: February 13, 1988: The cave was discovered during the monthly TSA volunteer work project. That month a monumental ridgewalk was executed in the Lively Pasture and 25 caves including this one were located.
Bibliography: ,Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


Cow Bone Cave (SAB 202) Length: ,Depth: 12'
Description: The entrance is an 8 inch by 1 foot round shaped hole in a rock. The cave takes a little water. The pit seems to end about 12 feet down. Air quality at the bottom of the pit is good. (Alvis Hill, 11/88).
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


SPACE HEATER CAVE (SAB 203) Length: 20' ,Depth: 39.5
Description:
History: ,February 13, 1988: The cave was discovered during the monthly TSA volunteer work project. That month a monumental ridgewalk was executed in the Lively Pasture and 25 caves including this one were located. The cave was completely filled with trash. An old space heater abandoned near the entrance is the source of the name.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


ORIENTEERING CAVE (SAB 204) Length: Depth:
Description:
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


SHARI'S DIET CAVE (SAB 205) Length: ,Depth:
Description:
Bibliography: ,Ref.:


CHIMNEYER'S DELIGHT (SAB 206) Length: 480'Depth: 50
Description: A 50 foot chimneyable drop leads to an intermittent stream passage which goes two directions. They explored downstream 200 to 300 feet with no end. At least 4 side passages were noted but not explored. Clay and Alvis had explored the upstream passage about 200 feet with no end in sight earlier Saturday morning. 8,Jay, Clay, John and David McClung entered Chimneyer's Delight. They mapped down the 50 foot drop. Upstream 230 feet of passage leads to a point where the passage is 20 feet wide but only 1 foot high. Downstream 250 feet the passage is 18 feet wide but only 1 foot high. In both directions, no end is in sight and good airflow was observed, especially upstream. Goat skulls and a lot of dry pristine white travertine dams were observed in the passage. A downstream side passage leads into a large room but a constriction prevented entrance into the passage. Walking passage with large breakdown and formations were beyond this impasse. Total surveyed length is 480 feet and total depth is 50 feet. Map: Survey notes and sketches available. Jay Jorden has originals and Butch Fralia has a copy.
History: March 12, 1988: Terry Holsinger discovered cave. Alvis Hill gave the cave it's name on the first expedition in when he said it was a Chimneyer's delight. ,May 12, 1988: Clay Chambers, Alvis Hill, Jay Jordan and Dave McClung begin survey of cave. ,June 11, 1988: David McClung and Clay Chambers explored the downstream passage of Chimneyer's Delight and were successful in breaking through a tight squeeze into the big room discovered on the previous trip to the cave.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


UNNAMED CAVE (SAB 207) Length: Depth:
Description: Need description cleanup! June 11, '88: Our next trek was to explore the pit found the previous weekend near the upper gold mine. We were joined by Danny, Bruce, Terry and Dale and headed for the cave. Butch descended the pit with the air quality meter with its sensing probe dangling below his feet as he rappelled. About 12 feet down, the meter began singing as air quality reached 19.5 %. A short distance deeper oxygen content fell to 18 %. Air quality held a steady 18 % until near the floor it was 17.5 %. The danger zone is 16 % oxygen content of the air. At this level, a candle will not light and it is time to leave the cave. At a depth of 55 feet Butch could derig from the rope and explore the cave. On exiting the cave, Butch described the cave as one of the prettiest caves of the park. The cave is quite wet and muddy and very much alive, containing several formations. While Butch was exploring the cave, I installed the danger sign, the cave location benchmark and the SAB tag. A note for future, the SAB 213 installed should be replaced with SAB 207 which is next in sequence. This will be done on a future trip.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


DALE'S BIRTHDAY CAVE (SAB 208) Length: Depth:
Description: Need description cleaned up! August 14,88 0,Meanwhile back at the caves, the remainder of the crew were excited about the potential of Dale's Birthday Cave. Jay entered the pit with oxygen sensor at side. Just below the entrance lip, the air quality read 17% oxygen as the sensing probe dangle d below his feet. As he reversed direction to make his ascent, he was peering into an estimated 40 foot deep fissure. The pit was about 7 foot long and tight but negotiable. 6,Prior to departing, they installed the marker SAB 208 about 11 foot at 303 degrees azimuth from the entrance. Statistics have shown that caves move very little once tagged down. We haven't lost a tagged cave yet. This cave is another candidate for the bad air evacuation experiment which will be performed on Blue Ribbon Pit in the near future.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


????? (SAB209) Length: ?'Depth: ?


FERN CAVE (SAB 210) Length: 15' ,Depth: 20
Description: ,The cave is located at the juncture of two joints. The entrance is approximately 15' long and 8' wide and drops approximately 20'. The north end is a borderline climb but the consensus of those who've visited the cave is that it should be rigged. It is basically one room with crevices following the fracture lines. Small flowstone and stalagmites were noted along the fractures. The floor sloped down to a small drain plugged with dirt and debris. The potential for further cave passage is limited. There are several small holes on the surface which feed into the cave. One entrance to the east of the main entrance could be accessed on rope. (Alvis Hill 11/9/91)
History: ,This cave was located on a ridge walk during the Colorado Bend State Park Work Project during the initial ridgewalk of the area. Cavers involved in the location were Butch Fralia, Keith Heuss, Terry Holsinger, and Jody Robinson. ,
Bibliography: Ref.:


UNAMED CAVE (SAB 211) Length: 150'+Depth: 53'+
Description: SAB 211 is entered through a sink approximately 3 feet wide and 6 feet long. Entry through a hole two feet in diameter leads down approximately eight feet into a room with some formations. Bat Guano on the floor of this room indicates bats have sometimes used this cave for temporary shelter. The floor of the room slopes down until it's approximately 15 feet below the surface. To the left of the room (viewed from the entrance) is a drop of 8 feet to a shelf followed by another drop of approximately 20 feet to reach a stream passage. The drops are climbable but the last drop should be belayed for safety. The stream bed below the drop is approximately 43 feet below the surface. The stream bed has passage running north and south. Following the down stream passage to the north, it drops approximately 4 feet and some 40 feet of hands and knees crawl, another drop is encountered. This drop is approximately 10 feet deep with passage again leading off to the north. After approximately 10 feet, the passage constricts due to mud blockage but larger passage continuing on can be seen past the blockage. To the south, the passage is the traditional San Saba bedding plane crawl. After leaving a roomy hands and knees room approximately 12 feet by 10 feet, the passage drops to approximately 1 foot ceilings by about 20 feet wide. In another 20 feet, passage remains wide but once again can traverse on hands and knees. The passage to the south was explored for approximately 100 feet, it continued on as hand s and knees as far as could be seen but alas the exploration was discontinued due to time limitations. Air quality never dropped below 20.5% during this visit. Trips during the late fall have seen air quality drop to 16.5% approximately 20 feet below t he surface. Future trips will see this cave surveyed and pushed to it's traversable end.8809 0,From here, some of us dropped into Gorman Creek and hiked upstream along the creek bed. We made our return trip near the fence line. We refound a cave near the area where Danny's Carlsbad Connection Cave is supposed to be located. We tagged the cave SAB 211. On our way back to the vehicles, we found a multi entrance cave which is flagged with green flagging tape. None of us could remember when this cave was found. 8,After a lunch break Butch, Quinta, Leigh Beth, Terry and I returned to SAB 211 and entered it. We had great expectations in the cave. We encountered a 30 foot deep pit about 40 feet into the cave. We rigged the pit and Butch prepared to descend. With the oxygen meter over his shoulder, he soon encountered bad air. He was at the top of the pit with the meter's sensor dangling about 6 feet below him. The meter was reading 16.5% at that point. We contemplated the situation for what seemed hours. We then decided to leave the pit for exploration when the cooler weather cleans the bad air out of the cave.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


Danny's Carlsbad Connection (SAB 212) Length: ?'Depth: ?


BEGINNERS LUCK CAVE (SAB 213) Length: 75'Depth: 12
Description: The cave entered through a fissure entrance approximately twelve feet long, one foot wide, and ten feet deep. Inside the entrance, passage branches left and right. The left hand passages ends in a large circular room with ten foot high ceilings. At the end of this room, a small passage led into a fissure like room fifteen foot long which began as walking passage but due to a twist to the side, ended in a two foot high passage. Each passage continues for thirty-five to fifty feet before ending. Some flowstone and a few small stalactites are present. The stalactites were about one foot long and appeared to have been broken off. They were alive with water dripping off the ends and have about two inches of new growth. Passage in the cave was about 3-1/ 2 feet high.
History: July 9, 1988: Donna Anderson, Don Denton, Ralph Jones and Danny Sherrod surveyed the cave.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


BFC (SAB 214) Length: ?'Depth: ?


????? (SAB 215) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Two Fissure Cave (SAB 216) Length: ?'Depth: ?


BE EXCELLENT CAVE (SAB 217) Length: Depth:
Description: Need good description!!!!!
History: July 8, '89 Saturday Morning, the camp was bare as the night before. Park Superintendent Tarin, drove to the camp at about 8: 30 A.M. and asked if we'd got our weekends confused? This was not the case however and arrangements were made to meet at the residence at 9: 30 to pick up the air meter and other equipment. The plans for the morning included visiting a cave located in Gorman Creek (Lively Pasture) during the June Trip. The cave represented a promising lead since during heavy rain, it tends to take all the water in the upper part of Gorman Creek. 2,The party, including Superintendent Tarin, met then proceeded to the creek bed and cave entrance. The small entrance appeared to require vertical equipment and Alvis Hill was small enough to get through the entrance with equipment. Armed with the Air Meter, he dropped the entrance to a breakdown floor some thirty feet below. The oxygen level dropped to nineteen and one-half percent but there was heavy airflow coming through the breakdown. Alvis dug through the breakdown and made an opening which allowed him to continue climbing. He continued to report his progress but finally reached a depth where he could no longer be heard. When Alvis finally emerged he had a promising report of the cave. 8,The cave drops for about thirty feet until a breakdown floor was encountered. At first glance it appears otherwise, but the entrance is climbable. Alvis dug out part of the floor which was a talus to the passage below. He climbed for approximately 70 feet until he reached a point where rope is definitely required. At a depth of one hundred feet, the passage drops for approximately twenty to thirty feet requiring vertical equipment. From there, the passage widens continuing downstream under Gorman Creek in the direction of Horseshoe Chimney. The passage sloped downward but there is air flow and the air quality never dropped below nineteen and one-half percent. 4,The cavers hadn't expected the cave to continue on in such a blatant manner and had come prepared for other work in the pasture. Butch Fralia was attired in cutoffs sans cave gear. The party decided to attend to a couple of other chores then return to camp for a change of clothing and equipment. The other chores didn't pan out because of equipment failure. The intent had been to install "Do Not Enter" signs on cave entrances but the drill refused to cooperate with the battery becoming fully discharged before one hole could be drilled. In the Lively Pasture, Superintendent Tarin joined the group then everyone headed for Be-Excellent cave initially to install an "Entry Prohibited" sign and help pass gear down into the cave for the exploration team. Doug Allen, Alvis Hill and Dawn Hill entered the cave where they would spend most of the day. They entered the narrow entrance to begin the 80' trip down to the bottom. The trip down consists of a 12' climb down to a ledge from which an offset passage leads down another 20' to a narrow slot. The slot continues down for another 30' until a short sloping passage leads to a 15' drop which is climbable but where a hand line is always rigged for safety. At the bottom of this drop, two passages lead off. One of the passages was previously traversable but it's now filled with mud brought in with the last rain. The other passage is a crawl through stream bed gravel for approximately 300-400' where there is an 8' chimney, up into a fissure with a domed ceiling 20-30' high. From this room, a 20' climb down leads into a low crawling passage which extends for about for about 60' to a room which has a great accumulation of surface mud. There is a big fissure in the room which is about 40' deep and stream bed can be seen at the bottom. This trip lasted nearly all day as every nook and cranny was explored to assure no side passages were missed. There is moving air throughout the extent of the cave and air appears to be blowing out of the fissure. The Saturdays exploration was discontinued due to lack of equipment to descend the 40' drop. This promises to be an extensive cave though the entrance size limits entry to smaller people. There is moving air throughout the explored extent of the cave and it heads downstream under Gorman Creek Bed toward Horseshoe Chimney and the Gorman Creek Crevice network. Impressive as it is, too small, diehard cavers, it will never be one of the tourist attractions of the park. It is of interest geologically and hydrologically since it takes in most of the water coming down Gorman Creek during heavy rain. November 11, '89,At this time, Alvis, Dawn and Doug returned from Be-Excellent Cave relating tales of the pit they had discovered back in the cave which they couldn't traverse without rope. After a short rest, the troops were gathered and everyone returned to Lively Pasture. Alvis and Doug, being smaller than nearly everyone present, made their way into the small Tie slide Fissure. Doug was able to drop for some distance and see there was a large passage leading off in one direction while another passage in the opposite direction was blocked but could possibly be opened with work. The passage was approximately 12' high but could not be explored due to very bad air. November 11, '89,The following morning; Carolyn Biegert, Cathy Chauvin and Alvis Hill again returned to Be-Excellent Cave with a rope to carry back and descend the 40' pit. They made the trip back and Alvis dropped the pit to discover more crawl passage going off. The passage was the traditional San Saba bedding plane crawl. This passage wasn't explored further.
Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


BLUE FUNGUS CAVE (SAB 218) Length: 11'+ Depth: 15'+
Description: The entrance to Blue Fungus Cave is a small fissure three feet long by one foot wide. The chimneyable entrance depth is ten feet deep. At the bottom the passage bells out then slopes downward toward the NE. (68o) for eleven feet. At the end of the passage the floor drops about three feet and continues on but it is two narrow to continue. A small flow stone occurs on one side wall at the end of the passage. The short passage is tall enough to walk in and air can be felt blowing in the cave.
History: August 13, '88: Visited by participants in the TSA Cave Research Volunteer Project. The cave was probably surveyed on that date .April 8, 1995: TSA Cave Research Volunteers, Peter Baron, Butch Fralia, Chris Jagge, Sharon Mastbrook, and Tina Schmid, visited the cave to gather data for a more detailed description.
Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


Tight Slide Crevice (SAB 219) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Glory Hole (SAB 220) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Ranger Walk (SAB 221) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Rabbit Run Grotto (SAB 222) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Be Snaky (SAB 223) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Cave No. 6 (SAB 224) Length: ?'Depth: ?


????? (SAB 225) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Embryo Cave (SAB 226) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Many Names (SAB 227) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Golden State Motor Oil Can Cave (SAB 228) Length: ?'Depth: ?


DD29 (SAB 229) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Cave of Sonora (SAB 230) Length: ?'Depth: ?


PG Pit (SAB 231) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Lone Bat II (SAB 232) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Polish Pit (SAB 233) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Red Gate (SAB 234) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Caves R us (SAB 235) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Extraction Pit (SAB 236) Length: ?'Depth: ?


(cave near Big Frog) (SAB237) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Big Frog Fissure (SAB 238) Length: ?'Depth: ?


CENTENNIAL CAVE (SAB 239) Length: 70'+ Depth: 53
Description: The cave entrance is a vertical sinkhole, located in a brushy area. The entrance is about fifteen feet long and three feet wide. From the entrance, the cave drops forty feet into a room approximately twenty feet in diameter with seven foot ceiling. In the southwest corner of the room is a ten foot deep pit. To the north end of the room, a short "boneyard" passage leads five feet to a slippery muddy drop about ten feet deep. Past the drop is a room approximately forty feet in diameter. Ceiling heigh ts range from three feet tapering down to nothing. Some flowstone and a rimstone dam is present.
Biology: Rhedine Beetles, and mice are observed in the cave.
History: The cave was discovered by Terry Holsinger in 1988. At discovery time, the cave was tentatively called "Early Riser, Move A Rock Slot." On the October 1991, scheduled volunteer TSA work project, Carolyn Biegart, Pat Geary, and others rediscovered the cave. The cave was filled with trash and appealed to the cavers interest in cave restoration. In November 1991, the cave clean up began. The clean up was completed and the cave entered January 11, 1992. ,Carolyn Biegart, Pat Geary, Keith Heuss and Jim Wolfe were the first to enter the cave. Exploration continued and preliminary cave description written January 12, 1992.
Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


PSYCHO (SAB 240) Length: 100'+ Depth: 153
Description: The cave is entered through a tight downward sloping tube approximately thirteen inches in diameter. About twelve feet down, a small shelf allows room to put on vertical equipment and attach to the rope. The drop, forty to fifty feet deep, leads to a down sloping crevice leading in the direction of the Colorado River. There is a stream passage at the bottom of the crevice with several bridges indicating multiple former stream levels. There are large formations in the largest room along the passage. The stream continues as a belly crawl in four to six inch deep mud, the drops eight feet to a dirt sump. There is no continuation of the passage. There are possible high leads along the older stream levels.
History : December 1991 The cave was discovered by Andy Lauer, Mary and Richard Speece and Ed Young. This was during the regularly scheduled TSA Volunteer work project. They noticed a flat rock that appeared to have a hole under it. Moving the rock aside, they discovered a tube about thirteen inches in diameter leading down. Dropping rocks into the cave lead the cavers to believe it was quite deep. 1,January, 1992: During the TSA Volunteer work project, Richard Speece, Jim Wolff and others entered the cave. They didn't go far. During the same weekend, Travis Kinchen, Andy Lauer, and Terry Holsinger entered the cave and using vertical equipment reached the floor of the cave. The cave received it's name because of the small down sloping entrance requiring "psyching up" to enter.
Biology: Unidentified frogs or toads were observed.
Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


Rune's Bad Air Cave (SAB 241) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Sheep's Den (SAB 242) Length: 32 feet: Depth:
Description: Sheeps Den is a small shelter cave formed at a pour-off point in a stream bed.  The shelter extent of the cave goes about 12 feet back and is 8 to 10 feet wide.  One small crawlwey is about 15  feet long and makes a semicircular route having two entrances in the shelter area.  A second crawlway extends about 20 feet and ends in a dome room about 2.5 feet high and about 5 feet across.  The crawlways are about 2 feet by 2 feet in size.  The floor was covered with sheep manure and the bones of a whole sheep are inside the shelter.
History: October 12, 1991:  This cave was located on a ridge walk by Butch Fralia, on a monthly Colorado Bend State Park work trip.  Donna Anderson, Mike Anderson, Terro Doversberger, Butch Fralia, Keith Heuss and Mark Porter were in the area trying to relocate Ranger's Walk Cave and/or Yellow Ribbon cave to ascertain their location and place cave number tags.  All in the party visited the cave and Donna Anderson pushed the small crawlways leading.
Ref.: Colorado Bend Volunteer TSA project trip reports and notes.


HARVESTMAN CRAWL CAVE (SAB 243)
Length: 21' Depth: 0
Description: The entrance to this cave is located on a cliff side about 15 ft above the base level of a creek which drains into the Colorado River approximately 500' down stream. A passage about 18" x 18" goes back about 11 feet. It then narrows to 12" high and continues another 10 feet. Many bones were found in the cave. The ceiling an floor of the smaller passages was covered with Harvestman giving the cave it's name.
History: October 12, 1991: This cave was located on a ridge walk during on a monthly Colorado Bend State Park work trip. Donna Anderson, Mike Anderson, Terry Doversberger, Butch Fralia, Keith Heuss and Mark Porter were in the area trying to relocate Ranger's Walk Cave and/or Yellow Ribbon cave to ascertain their location and place cave number tags. All in the party visited the cave and Donna Anderson pushed the small crawlway leading off.
Ref.: Colorado Bend Volunteer TSA project trip reports and notes.


Puberty Pit (SAB 244) Length: ?'Depth: ?


zzzzzzzzz (SAB 245) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Cave of no Return (SAB 246) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Snail's Pace (SAB 247) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Heavenly Snaks Cave (SAB 248) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Dinky Hammer (SAB 249) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Moose Twit Cave (SAB 250) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Hernia Hole (SAB 251) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Elmo's Hole (SAB 252) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Porcupine Cave (SAB 253) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Nila's VFC (SAB 254) Length: ?'Depth: ?


G-String Cave (SAB 255) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Emblem Cave (SAB 256) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Earth Day Delight (SAB 257) Length: ?'Depth: ?


(cave by roadway) (SAB 258) Length: ?'Depth: ?


REW Cave (SAB 259) Length: ?'Depth: ?


(cave behind REW) (SAB 260) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Ice Box Cave (SAB 261) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Cheap Thrill (SAB 262) Length: ?'Depth: ?
Description: This small cave consists of a single drop. At the floor of this cave there was a small "stream" flowing. The cave continues beyond the end of survey,. However it will require some enlargement of the passage to be humanly passable


Little Labyntnth Cave (SAB 263) Length: ?'Depth: ?


New Orleans (SAB 264) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Yellow Ribbon (SAB 265) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Flakey Rocks (SAB 266) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Gaspipe (SAB 267) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Red Flowstone Cave (SAB 268) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Cactus Toe Cave (SAB 269) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Gravel Suck Hole #2 (SAB '270) Length: ?'Depth: ?


End of Road Cave (SAB 271) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Hard Wedge  (SAB 272) Length: 3'Depth: 10
Description: A small fissure about six feet long drops ten feet into a three foot horizontal passage. The only redeeming benefit of the cave is that it's cool on a hot day.
History: April 8, 1995: TSA Cave Research Volunteers, Peter Baron, Butch Fralia, Chris Jagge, Sharon Mastbrook, and Tina Schmid, noticed three caves in the SW corner of Lively Pasture. These caves have probably been lost since the massive ridgewalk in the pasture, February, 1988. On "rediscovering" the caves, they gathered description data.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


Coon Scat Crevice (SAB 273) Length: 50'+Depth: 16.4
Description: This cave has two entrances in a large fissure system. The north most entrance has good acoustics to hear voices talking in other entrance fifty feet away. The tight fissure entrance drops 16.4' into a narrow passage. The passage is hard to negotiate because the widest part is about three feet off the floor. The end of the passage could not be seen. This cave could be traversed with a lot of "work!".
History: April 8, 1995: TSA Cave Research Volunteers, Peter Baron, Butch Fralia, Chris Jagge, Sharon Mastbrook, and Tina Schmid, noticed three caves in the SW corner of Lively Pasture. These caves have probably been lost since the massive ridgewalk in the pasture, February, 1988. On "rediscovering" the caves, they gathered description data.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


Spider Web Cave (SAB 274)  Length: 47'Depth: 30.3
Description: A small fissure entrance drops 20.3 feet into a ten foot passage at 260o azimuth. The passage terminates in a small room with draperies, flowstone and crystals on the wall. From the room another passage at 320o azimuth extends for 6.5 feet to a ten foot deep pit. At 20o azimuth in the pit, a tight fissure can be looked into. The fissure is about sixteen feet long with flowstone on the walls and the ceiling extends almost back to the surface. Another squeeze at the end of the fissure and another fifteen or so feet of passage can be seen with possible passage leading right or left.
History: April 8, 1995: TSA Cave Research Volunteers, Peter Baron, Butch Fralia, Chris Jagge, Sharon Mastbrook, and Tina Schmid, noticed three caves in the SW corner of Lively Pasture. These caves have probably been lost since the massive ridgewalk in the pasture, February, 1988. On "rediscovering" the caves, they gathered description data.
Bibliography: Ref.: Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


(???)  CAVE (SAB 275) Length: 18'Depth: 16
Description: : The entrance is located in a fifteen foot long fissure/sink trending east to west. A sixteen foot climb leads down into a west trending stoop walk passage leading about ten feet before the floor drops about three feet into a passage eight feet high, three feet wide and eight feet long. Nothing noteworthy was observed about the cave.
History May 13, 1995: TSA Cave Research Volunteers, Nila Dennis, Butch Fralia, Benjamin Heuss, Keith Heuss, and Sharon Mastbrook, located the fissure, in the area of SAB197 and SAB196, while visiting other caves in the area to gather description data
Bibliography : Colorado Bend State Park, TSA volunteer work project trip reports.


????? (SAB 276) Length: ?'Depth: ?


????? (SAB 277) Length: ?'Depth: ?


????? (SAB 278) Length: ?'Depth: ?


????? (SAB 279) Length: ?'Depth: ?


????? (SAB 280) Length: ?'Depth: ?


FF-BAC (SAB 281) Length: 138' Depth: 67'


Arizona Cave (SAB 282) Length: ?'Depth: ?


Good 'n Tight  (SAB283) Length: 168'+ Depth: 38'+



 
 


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